all-American cherries

They look nice in my pottery from Ravello.
They look nice in my pottery from Ravello.

Do you get Rainier cherries in your part of the world? Maybe they’re called something else. Here in Washington state, we call them delicious. They are only in season for a few weeks a year. They’re very delicate and probably don’t travel well. But they are the best treat of the summer.

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  1. Happy 4th Susan. Here in Mexico we have leches instead of those delicious looking cherries. Although the leches are juicey and sweet too. They only bloom every other year. So I put two trees in my garden that rotate each year. They are so expensive here that people knock on our front gate all summer long just to get a few for themselves.

    I agree with you on how the cherries look in your beautiful pottery. It makes it almost a shame to eat them…almost.

    Have a safe 4th and enjoy your treat!
    Vecia

  2. Happy 4th Susan. Here in Mexico we have leches instead of those delicious looking cherries. Although the leches are juicey and sweet too. They only bloom every other year. So I put two trees in my garden that rotate each year. They are so expensive here that people knock on our front gate all summer long just to get a few for themselves.
    I agree with you on how the cherries look in your beautiful pottery. It makes it almost a shame to eat them…almost.
    Have a safe 4th and enjoy your treat!
    Vecia

  3. Here in Montana we have bing cherries. Lovingly called Flathead cherries, because they are grown along Flathead Lake. Your Ranier cherries look like Queen Anne Cherries-also grown along the Flathead. I live in Missoula, and we get Flathead Cherries from 60 miles north, Bitterroot Macs (MacIntosh apples) from the BItterroot Valley which is 50 miles south and Dixon Melons (cantaloupe) from near the National Bison range which is about 40 or 50 miles NW of us. Makes for great farmer’s markets.

  4. Here in Montana we have bing cherries. Lovingly called Flathead cherries, because they are grown along Flathead Lake. Your Ranier cherries look like Queen Anne Cherries-also grown along the Flathead. I live in Missoula, and we get Flathead Cherries from 60 miles north, Bitterroot Macs (MacIntosh apples) from the BItterroot Valley which is 50 miles south and Dixon Melons (cantaloupe) from near the National Bison range which is about 40 or 50 miles NW of us. Makes for great farmer’s markets.

  5. We see “Queen Anne” cherries in the grocery store here in Florida for a very short period. And they’re way way pricey. I love visiting Seattle and going to Pike Place Market and seeing all the yummy varieties.

    I’m so jealous.

    1. Terry, that’s interesting that they call them “Queen Anne” cherries. One of the oldest and trendiest neighborhoods in Seattle is called Queen Anne.

  6. We see “Queen Anne” cherries in the grocery store here in Florida for a very short period. And they’re way way pricey. I love visiting Seattle and going to Pike Place Market and seeing all the yummy varieties.
    I’m so jealous.

    1. Terry, that’s interesting that they call them “Queen Anne” cherries. One of the oldest and trendiest neighborhoods in Seattle is called Queen Anne.

  7. Susan: Took 2 lbs of Rainiers all the way to Connecticut for the 4th of July. They traveled just as well as the ones I saw the next day in the Salisbury local market!! (For twice the price, of course…) Sheesh.

  8. Susan: Took 2 lbs of Rainiers all the way to Connecticut for the 4th of July. They traveled just as well as the ones I saw the next day in the Salisbury local market!! (For twice the price, of course…) Sheesh.

  9. I live in Southern California. I first ate a Rainier cherry about 5 years ago. Every year I look forward to a fresh crop of these delightful cherries. I can only afford to buy a small amount at one time, but they are worth every penny. I’m savoring some right this minute!

  10. I live in Southern California. I first ate a Rainier cherry about 5 years ago. Every year I look forward to a fresh crop of these delightful cherries. I can only afford to buy a small amount at one time, but they are worth every penny. I’m savoring some right this minute!

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